swingback.jpg

swingback.jpg

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DSCN2348.jpg

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DSCN0929.jpg

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DSCN2952.jpg

lakesidepath.jpg

lakesidepath.jpg

little Sandusky bridge

little Sandusky bridge

Big Sandusky bridge in Winter

Big Sandusky bridge in Winter

Img1989.jpg

Img1989.jpg

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DSCN2232.jpg

Sandusky Pearl Necklace approach

Sandusky Pearl Necklace approach

The boulder portion of this trail, the "pearl necklace" on the right, is a "B" route for advanced mountain bikers, whereas the lower trail is the primary route leading to the bridge.

3 backyard bridges linking boulders

3 backyard bridges linking boulders

Trails were meant to flow

As an avid mountain biker I am passionate about trails.  I have been studying sustainability of trails - i.e., how well they will stand the test of time and neither erode nor impact local streams, as well as methods of creating flowy trails - because whether on bike, foot, or horseback, it makes for a better experience as well as a gentler aesthetic.
 

In 2010 I was accepted into the ranks of the Professional Trailbuilders Association, and since have been excited to get do what I love on a full time basis.  We use specialized, narrow trail equipment and a highly skilled core team of builders.  

 

Thus far I have been intimately involved with the construction of over 60 miles of sustainable, flowy trail in California, throughout Sierra, Nevada, Placer, Napa, and San Luis Obispo counties.  We collaborate with local land managers, US Forest Service and other municipalities, as well as working with local people who would like a hiking trail on their property.

 

If you have an idea for a trail project of any size, please contact me.

Artisinal arch rock bridges...

Sometimes it's hard to imagine that a beautiful California forest trail could get any more beautiful - I found a way.  Sourcing local rock whenever possible, the placement of a simple arched-rock bridge adds both function as well as a stunning addition to surprise visitors, most of us do not encounter bridges out in the wilderness.  

 

Using highly sensitive methods for ensuring wet mortar stays out of streambeds and with minimal impact, we have built a wide variety of bridges ranging from low-profile arched rock culverts, to very small arched rock bridges of about a 5' span, to a beautiful 30' arched rock bridge on the Sandusky trail in Northern California. With engineering software from europe we were able to take into account the strength of the arch, thereby reducing the quantity of concrete required by over half. 

 

In addition to arched rock bridges we have enjoyed creating other elements on the trail, including faux bois benches, slab oak carved benches for lookout rest stops, cycle challenge "B" routes, gargoyles, hand carved signs, a ferrocement tunnel, runes and native symbology carved in trailside rocks. Given that Nature is art, I enjoy participating in adding in some human art, and have been working with local artists to create a program to get more local art on our public trails.